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Friday, July 22, 2011

The Red-vented Cockatoo of the Philippines

The Red-vented Cockatoo (Cacatua haematuropygia), locally known as Philippine cockatoo, Kalangay or Katala, is endemic species of cockatoo in the Philippines. This bird belongs to the family same with true parrots. Red-vented cockatoo is one of the rarest and classified as critically endangered species by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) due to illegal pet trade and destruction of habitat and direct persecution.

The plumage of red-vented cockatoo is all white with red undertail coverts tipped white and has yellowish undertail and pale yellow underwings. This bird grows at 12.2 inches long and has 8.6 inches wingspan. It makes bleating call and screeching or whistling noises. In captive environment, red-vented cockatoos has the ability to mimic voices and sounds same as parrots. They are social birds which are always found in flocks except in mating season from March to July. They feed on seeds, fruits, flowers, buds and nectar and also crops like rice and corns that why they are regarded sometimes as pest.

The remnants of red-vented cockatoos are distributed in Palawan, Tawi-tawi, Mindanao and Masbate with less than 1,000 in populations. Before it is found in almost any part of the Philippine islands except Northern and Central Luzon. Since 1998, Katala Foundation has been involves in the protection and conservation of this species of birds.

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Red-vented Cockatoo
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Red-Vented Cockatoo
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Red-Vented Cockatoo
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Red-Vented Cockatoo
Red-vented Cockatoo (also called the Philippin...Image via Wikipedia
Red-Vented Cockatoo
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Red-Vented Coackatoo
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Philippine Cockatoo
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Young Philippine Cockatoos
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Flocks of Philippine cockatoos in the trees at Rasa Island
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Group of Philippine cockatoos flying
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Poster of Philippine Cockatoo from Katala Foundation

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